11 Common Triumph Trident 660 Problems (Solutions Guide)

The Triumph Trident 660 is a new entry-level roadster combining classic style and modern technology.

Triumph’s all-star engineering department designed the Trident to appeal to a wide range of riders, from beginners to experienced enthusiasts.

In this article, we’ll explore some common problems affecting the Trident 660 and how to solve them.

Triumph Trident 660 Won’t Start

Dead Battery:

One of the most common reasons why a Trident 660 won’t start is a dead battery. If your bike makes a clicking noise but won’t turn over, or if nothing happens at all when you press the starter button, you may have a battery issue.

The battery is responsible for powering your bike’s electrical components, including the ignition, starter, and fuel injection systems.

To check if your battery is a problem, use a multimeter to measure its voltage or take it to an auto parts store for testing.

If the battery is low on charge, try trickle-charging it for a while or use a jumper cable to start your bike.

If the battery is expired, you’ll need to replace it with a new one.

To prevent your battery from dying, avoid leaving your bike unused for long periods, especially in cold weather.

Use a battery tender to keep your battery charged when not in use.

Faulty Starter:

A faulty starter system is another possible cause of a Trident 660 not starting. The starter system consists of three main components: the starter relay, the solenoid, and the starter motor. The starter relay transfers the battery’s charge to the starter system.

The solenoid is an electromagnet that activates the starter motor once charged by the relay.

The starter motor then turns the flywheel to start the engine.

If any of these components fail, your bike won’t start.

If the relay or solenoid is bad, you may hear a clicking sound from the starter gears failing to turn the flywheel or no sound at all.

To diagnose and fix a faulty starter system, you’ll need to access and test each component with a multimeter or a test light.

You may need to replace the defective part or clean and tighten the connections if they are loose or corroded.

You should avoid cranking your bike for too long or too often to prevent your starter system from failing, as this can wear out the components.

ABS Failure:

A less common but possible reason a Trident 660 won’t start is a faulty ABS (Anti-Lock Brake System). Some owners have reported that their bikes won’t start and show ABS fault codes on the dash after being left unused for a while.

Riders typically believe this issue to be due to a software glitch that prevents the bike from starting until the dealer resets the ABS.

To avoid this problem, you should ride your bike regularly and keep it in good condition.

You can also try turning off the ABS in the menu or disconnecting and reconnecting the battery to see if that clears up the fault.

If not, you’ll need to take your bike to the dealer for diagnosis and repair.

Triumph Trident 660 Won’t Stay Running

The most common reasons a Triumph Trident 660 won’t stay running are a dirty or clogged fuel system, faulty spark plugs or ignition coils, or loose or damaged electrical connections.

If the fuel tank, fuel pump, fuel filter, fuel injectors, and fuel lines are dirty or clogged, they can restrict fuel flow to the engine and cause poor performance or engine shutdown.

Check and clean the fuel system regularly. Use a fuel additive to clean the injectors and prevent deposits from forming, replacing the fuel filter if it is dirty or damaged.

If the spark plugs are worn out, fouled, or gapped incorrectly, they can produce a weak or inconsistent spark that can result in misfires or engine shutdown.

If the ignition coils are faulty, they can fail to deliver enough voltage to the spark plugs and cause similar problems.

If the spark plugs are worn out, fouled, or gapped incorrectly, they can produce a weak or inconsistent spark that can result in misfires or engine shutdown.

If the ignition coils are faulty, they can fail to deliver enough voltage to the spark plugs and cause similar problems.

Check and replace the spark plugs and ignition coils if they are faulty or damaged.

Use a spark plug tester to check the spark quality and a multimeter to check the resistance of the coils. Follow the recommended service intervals for replacing the spark plugs and ignition coils.

Triumph Trident 660 Won’t Crank

The most common reasons why a Triumph Trident 660 won’t crank are a low or dead battery, a faulty starter relay, or an ABS fault.

If your bike makes a clicking noise but won’t turn over, or if nothing happens at all when you press the starter button, you may have a battery issue. Check and charge the battery if it is low or replace it if it is expired.

If the relay is faulty, it can fail to deliver enough voltage to the starter system, resulting in no cranking. Check and replace the relay if it is bad.

If your Trident shows an ABS fault code on the dash and won’t crank, you may have a software glitch that prevents the bike from cranking until the dealer resets the ABS.

Try turning off the ABS in the menu or disconnecting and reconnecting the battery to clear the fault. If not, take your bike to the dealer for diagnosis and repair.

Triumph Trident 660 Won’t Start When Hot

The most common reasons a Triumph Trident 660 won’t start when hot is a faulty starter motor, a vapor lock in the fuel system, or a bad ignition switch. If the starter motor is defective, it can overheat and fail to crank the engine when hot.

Check and replace the starter motor if it is bad. If the fuel system is vapor locked, the fuel has vaporized in the lines or injectors due to high temperature and pressure.

This can prevent the fuel from reaching the engine and cause a no-start condition.

Try to cool down the fuel system by opening the gas cap, spraying water on the fuel lines, or waiting for the temperature to drop. Use a fuel additive that reduces vaporization, or avoid parking your bike in direct sunlight or near heat sources.

If the ignition switch is bad, it can lose contact when hot and cut off power to the ignition system.

This can cause a no-start condition or a sudden stall while riding. To check if the ignition switch is a problem, wiggle the key or tap on the switch and see if that restores power. If the ignition switch is bad, you’ll need to replace it with a new one.

Triumph Trident 660 Won’t Go Into Neutral

The most common reasons a Triumph Trident 660 won’t go into neutral are a misadjusted clutch cable, a worn clutch basket, or a bent shift fork.

If the clutch cable is misadjusted, it can prevent the clutch from fully disengaging and make it hard to shift into neutral.

To fix this problem, you can adjust the clutch cable at the lever or at the engine end until you have some free play and smooth operation.

Check and adjust the clutch cable regularly and lubricate it with a suitable cable lube.

If the clutch basket is worn, it can cause the clutch plates to stick together and make it hard to shift into neutral.

To check if the clutch basket is worn, you can remove the clutch cover and inspect the basket for any grooves or notches on its fingers. You’ll need to replace a worn basket with a new one or file down the grooves carefully.

If the shift fork is bent, it can cause the transmission gears to misalign and make it hard to shift into neutral.

To check if the shift fork is distorted, remove the engine and split the cases to access the transmission. If the shift fork is bent, you’ll need to replace it with a new one.

Triumph Trident 660 Won’t Rev Up

The most common reasons a Triumph Trident 660 won’t rev up are a dirty or clogged air filter, a faulty throttle position sensor, or a bad fuel pump.

If the air filter is dirty or clogged, it can restrict airflow to the engine and cause poor performance or loss of power. Check and clean the air filter regularly or replace it if it is damaged.

If the throttle position sensor is faulty, it can send incorrect signals to the engine control unit and affect the fuel injection and ignition timing.

This can cause hesitation, surging, or stalling when you twist the throttle. Use a multimeter to measure its resistance or voltage.

If the sensor is faulty, you’ll need to replace it.

If the fuel pump is bad, it can fail to deliver enough fuel pressure to the injectors and cause lean or rich conditions.

This can cause misfires, backfires, or engine shutdowns.

Use a fuel pressure gauge to measure its output or listen for any unusual noises from the pump. Replace a faulty pump with a new one.

Triumph Trident 660 Won’t Go Into Gear

The most common reasons a Triumph Trident 660 won’t go into gear are a misadjusted clutch cable, a worn clutch basket, or a bent shift fork.

If the clutch cable is misadjusted, it can prevent it from fully disengaging and make it hard to shift into gear.

Adjust the clutch cable at the lever or engine end until you have free play and smooth operation.

If the clutch basket is worn, it can cause the clutch plates to stick together and make it hard to shift into gear.

To check if the clutch basket is worn, you can remove the clutch cover and inspect the basket for any grooves or notches on its fingers. Replace a worn clutch basket asap.

If the shift fork is bent, it can cause the transmission gears to misalign and make it hard to shift into gear. If the shift fork is bent, you must replace it with a new one.

Triumph Trident 660 Not Idling

The most common reasons a Triumph Trident 660 is not idling are a dirty or clogged idle air control valve, a faulty throttle position sensor, or a bad engine control unit.

If the idle air control valve is dirty or clogged, it can prevent the engine from getting enough air at idle and cause stalling or rough idling.

Check and clean the idle air control valve regularly or replace it if it is damaged.

If the throttle position sensor (TPS) is faulty, it can send incorrect signals to the engine control unit and affect the fuel injection and ignition timing, impacting your Trident’s idle.

To check if the sensor is faulty, you can use a multimeter to measure its resistance or voltage. Replace a faulty TPS with a new one.

If the engine control unit (ECU) is bad, it can fail to regulate the engine functions appropriately and cause various problems, including poor idling.

Use a diagnostic tool to scan for any trouble codes or reset the adaptations by letting the bike idle until the fan turns on and then turning it off for 12 minutes.

If the engine control unit is bad, you’ll need to replace it asap, as it’s critical to safe and efficient motorcycle operation.

Triumph Trident 660 Overheating

The most common reasons why a Triumph Trident 660 overheating are a low coolant level, a faulty thermostat, or a faulty coolant pump.

If the coolant level is low, it can cause the engine to overheat and damage the components. Check and top up the coolant level regularly, replacing your fluids if dirty or contaminated.

A faulty thermostat can fail to open or close properly, affecting the coolant flow and temperature. This can cause the engine to overheat or run too cold.

Use a thermometer to measure the coolant temperature at the radiator cap and compare it with the temperature gauge on the dash. If the thermostat is faulty, you’ll need to replace it with a new one.

If the water pump is failing, it can fail to circulate the coolant through the engine and radiator, leading to overheating.

Check if the water pump is bad by looking for any signs of leaks, noises, or corrosion around the pump.

Feel the radiator hoses for any changes in pressure or temperature when the engine is running. If the water pump is bad, you’ll need to replace it with a new one.

Triumph Trident 660 Leaking Oil

The most common reasons a Triumph Trident 660 leaks oil are a damaged oil filter, a loose oil drain plug, or a cracked oil sump.

If the oil filter is damaged, oil can seep out and stain the engine and the ground.

Check and replace the oil filter regularly if it is dented, punctured, or torn. If the oil drain plug is loose, it can cause oil to drip from the bottom of the engine.

Check and tighten the oil drain plug regularly. If it is stripped, cross-threaded, or missing, or if the oil sump is cracked, it can cause a significant oil leak that can damage the engine and other components.

Check and replace the oil sump if it is cracked, dented, or corroded.

Triumph Trident 660 Losing Power

The most common reasons a Triumph Trident loses power are a dirty or clogged fuel system, a faulty spark plug or ignition coil, or a bad engine control unit. If the fuel system is dirty or clogged, it can restrict fuel flow to the engine and cause poor performance or loss of power.

Check and clean the fuel system regularly. Use a fuel additive to clean the injectors and prevent deposits from forming. Replace the fuel filter if it is dirty or damaged. I

If the spark plugs or ignition coil is faulty, it can produce a weak or inconsistent spark that can result in misfires or loss of power.

Check and replace the spark plug and ignition coil if faulty or damaged.

Use a spark plug tester to check the spark quality and a multimeter to check the coil’s resistance.

Follow the recommended service intervals for replacing the spark plug and ignition coil.

If the ECU is bad, it can fail to regulate the engine functions appropriately and cause various problems, including loss of power.

Check if the engine control unit is bad by using a diagnostic tool to scan for any trouble codes or reset the adaptations by letting the bike idle until the fan turns on and then turning it off for 12 minutes.

If the engine control unit is bad, you’ll need to replace it with a new one.

Author:

  • Michael Ta Nous

    I've been weaving words into stories since my early scribbling days, and my journey in the world of motorcycles and their communities spans almost two decades. Living with a talented motorcycle mechanic as a roommate, our garage transformed into a vibrant workshop where I absorbed the intricacies of...